The People, The Parish

We are Episcopalians
The Episcopal Church is a member of the Anglican Communion, derived from the Church of England and sharing with it traditions of faith and order as set forth in the Book of Common Prayer. We are bound together with other members of the Communion by our liturgy, by the prayers we have in common. Our traditions include attitudes that are Protestant and Catholic, both ancient and reformed, both liberal and conservative.

We are a church with few “shoulds,” pointing out, but not dictating, a response to God. Episcopalians find the source for our expression of faith equally in the Scriptures, Reason, and Tradition.

The Holy Scriptures
We are a church with few “shoulds,” pointing out, but not dictating, a response to God. Episcopalians find the source for our expression of faith equally in the Scriptures, Reason, and Tradition.

Reason
For Anglicans, God’s grace is ever present to our rational minds, making it possible for God’s Spirit to lead us into truth. We believe that reason is more than logical analysis. It includes the intuitive way of thinking and knowing and therefore prayerful, contemplative reflection on contemporary human experience and knowledge in the light of the Scriptures and tradition.

Tradition
The wisdom of the Christian community throughout its history is also important to our Anglican expression. We give special consideration to the first five centuries and the councils, creeds and canons. Tradition’s role is to give witness to the Scriptures through our worship and practices. We believe the Scriptures inform tradition and tradition informs the Scriptures.

Looking to Scripture, Reason and Tradition does not protect us in the church from disagreement and creative tension, but leads us to allow the authority of love to hold us together.

The Sacraments
We recognize and celebrate the historic seven sacraments. We believe the two sacraments instituted by Christ are primary to the life of the church. Baptism, in the Episcopal Church, is an initiatory rite practiced primarily by the pouring of water on the head as a sign of rebirth into the community. Holy Eucharist is the offering, serving, and eating of bread and wine as a remembrance of Christ’s sacrifice and promises. Anyone who has been baptized, and for whom it is permissible with their own church, is welcome to receive Holy Communion in our church.

The other five sacraments of Confirmation, Matrimony, Ordination, Penance, and Healing are offered and observed as needed.

As Servants
St. Luke’s, like other parishes in the Episcopal Church, is led by a Vestry or Bishop’s Committee composed of the vicar and elected members of the congregation. The committee meets monthly to carry out the business and affairs of the parish.

Bishop’s Committee:
Senior Warden Diane Montague
Junior Warden Keith Montague
Nate Johnson
Jolene Loftin
Robert McCray
Jenny Wood

In addition parishioners serve as or through: